Child and Youth Care Forum

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 39–52 | Cite as

Organizational climate and job satisfaction among child care teachers

  • Sandra Pope
  • Andrew J. Stremmel
Articles

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of organizational climate and job satisfaction. Ninety-four child care teachers from 27 licensed child care centers were surveyed. The results suggested that organizational climate, when operationalized as aggregate center climate, and job satisfaction may be dynamically related, yet provide distinct sources of information about the work environment.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra Pope
    • 1
  • Andrew J. Stremmel
    • 1
  1. 1.Family and Child DevelopmentVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburg

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