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Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 175–191 | Cite as

Television as a diagnostic indicator in child therapy: An exploratory study

  • James Shanahan
  • Michael Morgan
Articles

Abstract

This paper explores the relation between television viewing and clinical indicators for the mental health profession. Television viewing is seen from a systemic process perspective, based on data about children in therapy from therapists and parents. Family viewing patterns appear to be related to certain types of clinical indicators, especially attention deficit disorder and acting out. Of particular interest is the finding of a strong association between parental viewing habits and ADD on the part of children. The results suggest that television may be a useful indicator of family health for mental health practitioners and researchers.

Keywords

Mental Health Health Profession Social Psychology Systemic Process Exploratory Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Shanahan
    • 1
  • Michael Morgan
    • 1
  1. 1.Communication Dept.University of Massachusets/AmherstAmherst

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