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Cytotechnology

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 117–125 | Cite as

Effects of organic pH buffers on a cell growth and an antibody production of human-human hybridoma HB4C5 cells in a serum-free culture

  • Kazuhiko Nagira
  • Midori Hayashida
  • Masanobu Shiga
  • Kazumi Sasamoto
  • Ken'yu Kina
  • Kazuhiro Osada
  • Takuya Sugahara
  • Hiroki Murakami
Article

Abstract

Human-human hybridoma cells secreting a human monoclonal antibody were cultured in a serum-free medium containing various organic pH buffers in order to clarify their effects on cell growth and antibody production. Organic pH buffers having either one sulfonic acid and several acyclic amine moieties, or several cyclic amine moieties containing two amino nitrogen did not inhibit cell growth; while other organic buffers sulfonic acid moiety plus several cyclic amine moieties containing one amino nitrogen slightly decreased cell growth, but enhanced antibody production. Using Fujita's organic conceptual diagram, a relationship between the organicity and inorganicity of a pH buffer to cell growth and antibody production was found. pH buffers with large inorganicity and small organicity values were favorable for cell growth, and buffers with small inorganicity and large organicity values were preferred to enhance antibody production. Although the pH buffering range affects cell growth, its effect on antibody production is not clear. In conclusion, 2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid (MES), 3-morpholino-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) and 1, 2-N, N′-bis[N″, N‴-di(2-sulfonoethyl)piperazinyl]ethane (Bis-PIPES) are shown to be the most optimal of the buffers tested, because they enhanced antibody production without decreasing the cell growth among the pH buffers tested here.

Key words

antibody production cell growth chemical structure human-human hybridoma organic conceptual diagram organic pH buffer 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhiko Nagira
    • 1
  • Midori Hayashida
    • 2
  • Masanobu Shiga
    • 1
  • Kazumi Sasamoto
    • 1
  • Ken'yu Kina
    • 1
  • Kazuhiro Osada
    • 2
  • Takuya Sugahara
    • 2
  • Hiroki Murakami
    • 2
  1. 1.Dojindo LaboratoriesKumamotoJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory of Cellular Regulation Technology, Graduate School of Genetic Resources TechnologyFukuokaKyushu UniversityJapan

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