Euphytica

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 265–273

Yield potential and drought tolerance of segregating populations of barley in contrasting environments

  • S. Ceccarelli
Resistance and Tolerance

Summary

Using the traditional approach (selection for grain yield) it has been found that F3 families derived from F2's selected under unfavourable conditions were more vigorous in the early stages of growth, taller, earlier in heading and with larger yields than F3 families derived from F2's selected under favourable conditions. A high and negative correlation coefficient was found between the drought susceptibility index and grain yield at the driest site, whereas at the wettest site the correlation coefficients were lower and in some cases positive, indicating the existence of traits which are desirable under drought and undesirable under favourable conditions, or vice versa.

Expected responses to selection for grain yield using different selection criteria indicated that selection under stress conditions is expected to be more efficient than selection under favourable conditions when dry areas is the target environment.

Expected responses to selection for grain yield using different selection criteria indicated that selection under stress conditions is expected to be more efficient than selection under favourable conditions when dry areas is the target environment.

Index words

Hordeum vulgare barley dry areas stress-tolerance stability bulk method multilocation testing 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Ceccarelli
    • 1
  1. 1.The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry AreasAleppoSyria

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