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Foundations of Physics

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 257–269 | Cite as

Cosmological implications of anomalous redshifts—A possible working hypothesis

  • T. Jaakkola
  • M. Moles
  • J. P. Vigier
  • J. C. Pecker
  • W. Yourgrau
Article

Abstract

An analysis of the most recent experimental data shows that the isotropic and universal proportionality of redshift to distance, predicted for all distant objects by the expanding universe model, cannot be regarded as an established fact at the present stage of experimental knowledge. An interpretation of the conflicting data is given in terms of interactions between nonzero-mass photons and light scalar bosons. This leads to a new, static, Einstein-type hierarchical model of the universe, where the cosmological redshift results essentially from a tired-light effect.

Keywords

Experimental Data Hierarchical Model Present Stage Universe Model Experimental Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Jaakkola
    • 1
  • M. Moles
    • 2
  • J. P. Vigier
    • 2
  • J. C. Pecker
    • 3
  • W. Yourgrau
    • 4
  1. 1.Observatory and Astrophysics LaboratoryUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Institut Henri PoincaréParisFrance
  3. 3.Collège de France et Institut d'Astrophysique du C.N.R.S.ParisFrance
  4. 4.University of DenverDenver

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