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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 17–24 | Cite as

Can Australian farming systems be more sylvan?

  • C. A. Campbell
Article

Abstract

This paper discusses the extent to which Australian agriculture is integrating trees into farming systems and concludes that while broad environmental awareness and concern may have increased, Australian agriculture exemplifies essentially the same attitudes to native vegetation as those held by the first European settlers. It is suggested that for real change to occur, land users require three key ingredients — commitment, knowledge and resources. The state of play with respect to each of these key factors is reviewed and suggestions for reform mooted.

Key words

Australian farming systems extension farmer attitudes revegetation policy vision 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. Campbell
    • 1
  1. 1.School of AgricultureUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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