Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 57–80 | Cite as

Informal surveys to assess social forestry at Dibandiba and Aleta Wendo, Ethiopia

  • J. Kahurananga
  • Y. Alemayehu
  • S. Tadesse
  • T. Bekele
Article

Abstract

Two surveys were carried out at Dibandiba, a semi-arid site in central Ethiopia, and Aleta Wendo, a sub-humid site in southern Ethiopia, to assess farmers' attitudes toward and perceptions of tree planting, levels of social forestry and uses of tree products. At Dibandiba, farmers planted mostlyEucalyptus camaldulensis trees, exclusively on homesteads andAcacia albida was left on farmland. Trees were planted mainly for construction (32%), fuelwood (29%), shade (11%) and cash (11%). Major (85%) uses were fencing, fuelwood, construction and plough handles. Dung was the major source of fuel (56%). At Aleta Wendo, planting consisted ofEucalyptus globulus mostly on private woodlots and homesteads, ofMilletia ferruginea andCordia abyssinica on farms, and ofEuphorbia abyssinica on fences and boundaries. Avocado and pears were also planted. The uses were the same as at Dibandiba. Major constraints were lack of seedlings and shortage of land at both sites, plus shortage of water at Dibandiba. Also, a review of information obtained from previous surveys on household composition and income, farm holding, cropping pattern, livestock composition and the use of labour was made.

Key words

informal survey social forestry Ethiopia 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Kahurananga
    • 1
  • Y. Alemayehu
    • 1
  • S. Tadesse
    • 1
  • T. Bekele
    • 1
  1. 1.Forest Research CentreAddis AbabaEthiopia

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