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Wood Science and Technology

, Volume 32, Issue 3, pp 161–170 | Cite as

Combinations of wood and silicate Part 6. Biological resistances of wood-mineral composites using water glass-boron compound system

  • T. Furuno
  • Y. Imamura
Originals

Summary

Wood-mineral composites were made by introducing inorganic substances into wood using the water glass (sodium silicate)-boron compound system (double treatment). Composites were also prepared with boron compounds alone (single treatment), and biological resistances of the two types of composites were evaluated and compared.

After the leaching procedure, the composites using the water glass-boron compound system showed generally excellent termite resistances with the negligible weight losses of specimens and high mortalities of workers and soldiers. On the contrary, the single treatment and the double treatment using the reactants of non-boron compounds showed slight or little resistances against termite attacks, accounting for the high leachability of the inorganic substances formed in wood and/or low effectiveness of the chemicals.

Also, the water glass-boron compound system was found to enhance greatly the decay resistances if water-soluble inorganic substances were fully removed out from the specimens. The formation of insoluble inorganic substances in the water glass-boron compound system proved to contribute much to the enhancement of biological resistances.

Keywords

Sodium Silicate Boron High Mortality Single Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Furuno
    • 1
  • Y. Imamura
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Natural Resources Process EngineeringFaculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University MatsueShimaneJapan
  2. 2.Wood Research InstituteKyoto University UjiKyotoJapan

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