Urological Research

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 377–380

Immortalisation of human urothelial cells

  • J. L. Petzoldt
  • I. M. Leigh
  • P. G. Duffy
  • C. Sexton
  • J. R. W. Masters
Original Paper

Abstract

A cell line derived from the urothelium lining the ureter of a 12-year-old girl was immortalised using a temperature-sensitive SV40 large T-antigen gene construct, and designated UROtsa. Following immortalisation, UROtsa cells expressed SV40 large T-antigen, but did not acquire characteristics of neoplastic transformation, including growth in soft agar or the development of tumours in nude mice. Metaphase spreads had a normal chromosomal appearance and number. UROtsa cells remained permissive for cell growth at 39°C, indicating that they did not retain temperature sensitivity. UROtsa provides an in vitro model of “normal” urothelium.

Key words

Normal urothelium In vitro Immortalisation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Petzoldt
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. M. Leigh
    • 2
  • P. G. Duffy
    • 1
  • C. Sexton
    • 2
  • J. R. W. Masters
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Urology and Nephrology, 3rd Floor Research LaboratoriesUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Experimental Dermatology LaboratoryThe London HospitalLondonUK

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