Journal of Science Education and Technology

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 359–370 | Cite as

Constructivism and science education: Some epistemological problems

  • Michael R. Matthews
Article

Abstract

The paper outlines the significant influence of constructivism in contemporary science and mathematics education and emphasizes the central role that epistemology plays in constructivist theory and practice. It is claimed that constructivism is basically a variant of old-style empiricist epistemology, which had its origins in Aristotle's individualist and sense-based theory of knowledge. There are well-known problems with empiricism from which constructivism appears unable to dissociate itself.

Key words

Constructivism empiricism epistemology Aristotle Galileo 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael R. Matthews
    • 1
  1. 1.Education DepartmentUniversity of AucklandAuckland

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