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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 30, Issue 3, pp 243–249 | Cite as

Diffuse periventricular and meningeal glioma

  • Devinder Bhrany
  • Michael G. Murphy
  • Simon Horenstein
  • Shirley W. Silbert
Original Investigations

Summary

Diffuse periventricular and meningeal gliomatosis occurring together in one patient without underlying definite infiltrative mass is a rare occurrence. A 46 year old woman suffered severe recurrent headaches for the last 18 months of her life. An acute confusional illness with increased intracranial pressure appeared 4 months before death and was followed by progressive mental deterioration, multiple cranial nerve palsies, weakness, muscle atrophy, sensory loss involving all four extremities and loss of bowel and bladder control. Postmortem diffuse glioma was found to involve the periventricular regions of the 3rd and 4th ventricles and the subarachnoid space throughout the cerebrospinal axis, along and around the cranial and spinal nerves. It is suggested in this case that the primary neoplastic change occurred in the subependymal glia with subsequent seeding of tumor cells throughout the subarachnoid space via cerebrospinal fluid pathways.

Key words

Glioma Periventricular Meningeal Subependymal Glia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Devinder Bhrany
    • 1
  • Michael G. Murphy
    • 1
  • Simon Horenstein
    • 1
  • Shirley W. Silbert
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pathology (Neuropathology), Neurosurgery, and NeurologySt. Louis University Medical SchoolSt. LouisUSA

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