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Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 418–424 | Cite as

The tetracycline analogs minocycline and doxycycline inhibit angiogenesis in vitro by a non-metalloproteinase-dependent mechanism

  • S. Gilbertson-Beadling
  • E. A. Powers
  • M. Stamp-Cole
  • P. S. Scott
  • T. L. Wallace
  • J. Copeland
  • G. Petzold
  • M. Mitchell
  • S. Ledbetter
  • R. Poorman
  • J. W. Wilks
  • C. Fisher
Original Article Angiogene Metalloprotein Tetracycline, Minocycl Doxycyc

Abstract

The tetracycline analogs minocycline and doxycycline are inhibitors of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and have been shown to inhibit angiogenesis in vivo. To further study the mechanism of action of these compounds we tested them in an in vitro model of angiogenesis: aortic sprouting in fibrin gels. Angiogenesis was quantitated in this system by a unique application of planar morphometry. Both compounds were found to potently inhibit angiogenesis in this model. To further characterize the activity of these compounds against MMPs, we determined the IC50s of both compounds against representatives of three classes of metalloproteinases: fibroblast collagenase, stromelysin, and gelatinase A. Doxycycline was found to inhibit collagenase, gelatinase A and stromelysin with IC50s of 452 μM, 56 μM and 32 μM, respectively. Minocycline was found to inhibit only stromelysin in the micromolar range with an IC50 of 290 μM. Since these results suggest that these compounds may not have been inhibiting in vitro angiogenesis by an MMP-dependent mechanism, we decided to test the effects of the potent MMP inhibitor BB-94. This compound failed to inhibit aortic sprouting in fibrin gels, thus strongly suggesting that both doxycycline and minocycline act by an MMP-independent mechanism. These results have implications for the mechanism of action of tetracycline analogs, particularly where they are being considered for the treatment of disorders of extracellular matrix degradation including periodontal disease, arthritis, and tumor angiogenesis.

Key words

Angiogenesis Metalloproteinase Tetracycline Minocycline Doxycycline 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Gilbertson-Beadling
    • 1
  • E. A. Powers
    • 1
  • M. Stamp-Cole
    • 1
  • P. S. Scott
    • 1
  • T. L. Wallace
    • 1
  • J. Copeland
    • 1
  • G. Petzold
    • 1
  • M. Mitchell
    • 2
  • S. Ledbetter
    • 1
  • R. Poorman
    • 1
  • J. W. Wilks
    • 1
  • C. Fisher
    • 1
  1. 1.Cancer and Infectious Diseases Research, Upjohn LaboratoriesThe Upjohn CompanyKalamazooUSA
  2. 2.Medional Chemistry Research, Upjohn LaboratoriesThe Upjohn CompanyKalamazooUSA

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