Archives of oto-rhino-laryngology

, Volume 228, Issue 4, pp 295–298

Effect of emotional stress on hearing

  • C. Muchnik
  • M. Hildesheimer
  • M. Rubinstein
Article

Summary

An experimental model for emotional stress is described. Emotional stress can affect hearing if severe enough or if it lasts long enough. The noxious effect on the ear can be explained by the high level of blood catecholamines and exaggerated activity of the cochlear sympathetic innervation.

Key words

Emotional stress Hearing 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Muchnik
    • 1
  • M. Hildesheimer
    • 1
  • M. Rubinstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Audiology DepartmentChaim Sheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael

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