The effect of a 5-month endurance-training programme on physical activity: evidence for a sex-difference in the metabolic response to exercise

  • G. A. L. Meijer
  • G. M. E. Janssen
  • K. R. Westerterp
  • F. Verhoeven
  • W. H. M. Saris
  • F. ten Hoor
Article

Summary

The effect of a 5-month endurance training programme on physical activity and average daily metabolic rate (ADMR) was studied. Subjects were 16 males and 16 females preparing for a half marathon. Total physical activity, measured using an accelerometer, had increased by 62% and 63% after 20 weeks in males and females, respectively. Physical activity during the non-exercise part of the day did not change although in males it tended to increase (15%, NS). The ADMR had increased significantly in males after 8 and 20 weeks (+2.3 and +3.3 MJ· day−1, respectively,P<0.05) and exceeded the net energy expenditure for endurance-training three to four times. In females no significant increase in ADMR was found (+ 1.5 and + 1.3 MJ·day−1, after 8 and 20 weeks, respectively). In females the change in ADMR could be largely attributed to the net cost of running itself and a small increase (10%) in resting metabolic rate during the time of day they were awake. In males a discrepancy was observed between the increase of ADMR and the expenditure due to exercise and non-exercise activities. We suggest exercise stimulates habitual physical activity and diet-induced thermogenesis in males but not in females.

Key words

Physical activity Endurance-training Energy metabolism Doubly labelled water Accelerometer 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. L. Meijer
    • 1
  • G. M. E. Janssen
    • 1
  • K. R. Westerterp
    • 1
  • F. Verhoeven
    • 1
  • W. H. M. Saris
    • 1
  • F. ten Hoor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human BiologyUniversity of LimburgMD MaastrichtThe Netherlands

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