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Neuroradiology

, Volume 35, Issue 6, pp 420–423 | Cite as

CT appearances of haematomas in the corpus callosum in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

  • A. Jackson
  • J. B. Fitzgerald
  • R. W. J. Hartley
  • A. Leonard
  • J. Yates
Diagnostic Neuroradiology

Abstract

Corpus callosum heamatoma is a rare feature in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which may result from aneurysms of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) or pericallosal artery (PCA). In 348 patients with aneurysmal SAH, bleeding from ACoA aneurysms in 88 cases produced no abnormality on CT in 7. Blood in the cistern of the lamina terminalis was the most frequent abnormality (76/88); haematomas of the septum pellucidum, confined to patients with ACoA aneurysms, were seen in 26 (30%). Rupture of PCA aneurysms in 12 patients gave rise to blood in the pericallosal cistern, anterior interhemispheric fissure and cistern of the lamina terminalis in 11. There was no blood in the septum pellucidum or the ventricular system in any case, but haematomas in the corpus callosum occurred in 8 (67%). In all of these, blood extended into the anterodorsal aspect of the callosum and spread posteriorly along its dorsal border. An identical, supracallosal pattern was seen in 2 patients (2.5%) with ACoA aneurysms, in whom haemorrhage was more extensive, with a large frontal lobe haematoma extending up from the cistern of the lamina terminalis in 1 and a haematoma of the septum pellucidum, with intraventricular extension in the other. In 8 patients (9%) with ACoA aneurysms a corpus callosum haematoma appeared to result from passage of blood up through the cistern of the lamina terminalis into the septum pellucidum and thence into the ventral aspect of the anterior corpus callosum; blood was present within the cistern, the septum and the ventricles.

Key words

Subarachnoid haemorrhage Corpus callosum Computed tomography Cerebral haematoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Jackson
    • 1
  • J. B. Fitzgerald
    • 1
  • R. W. J. Hartley
    • 1
  • A. Leonard
    • 1
  • J. Yates
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeuroradiologyManchester Royal InfirmaryManchesterUK

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