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Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 106–108 | Cite as

Angiolipoma of the stomach as a cause of chronic upper gastrointestinal bleeding

  • Peter H. DeRidder
  • Allan J. Levine
  • Joseph J. Katta
  • James A. Catto
Case Reports

Summary

Angiolipomas are benign vascular fatty neoplasms, usually found in the subcutis of the trunk. Gastric angiolipomas have not been described. We report a gastric angiolipoma causing chronic gastrointestinal bleeding that did not respond to electrocoagulation and required surgical resection. Its classic endoscopic appearance is described. It may be managed endoscopically, utilizing either heater probe or laser photocoagulation and, therefore, should be recognized endoscopically prior to treatment.

Key words

Angiolipoma Gastrointestinal bleeding 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter H. DeRidder
    • 1
  • Allan J. Levine
    • 1
  • Joseph J. Katta
    • 1
  • James A. Catto
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pathology and SurgeryWilliam Beaumont HospitalRoyal OakUSA

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