Psychopharmacology

, Volume 99, Issue 4, pp 501–507

Time course of amphetamine-induced locomotor stereotypy in an open field

  • Kathyrne Mueller
  • Paul M. Kunko
  • David Whiteside
  • Cynthia Haskett
Original Investigations

Abstract

Gamma (\(\hat \gamma\)) is a recently proposed statistic that quantifies and describes the repetitive patterns of locomotion (locomotor stereotypy) exhibited by amphetamine-treated rats in an open field. The time-course of locomotor stereotypy after 1, 2, 3, and 4 mg/kg amphetamine was investigated in this research. Locomotor stereotypy was often evident during the first observation period after amphetamine. Lower doses of amphetamine produced qualitatively different locomotor stereotypy than higher doses. Rats given higher doses of amphetamine exhibited locomotor stereotypy during the “hyperactivity” phase of the three-phase response produced by higher doses of amphetamine (hyperactivity; absence of locomotions, increased sniffing, biting etc.; hyperactivity). Contrary to expections, rats injected with 2 mg/kg amphetamine exhibited the highest and most sustained increase in\(\hat \gamma\). We conclude that locomotor stereotypy is an important component of the behavioral effects of amphetamine in rats. Whether locomotor stereotypy and focused stereotypy are similar phenomena is still unclear.

Key words

Amphetamine Locomotor patterns Locomotor stereotypy Stereotypy Open field behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathyrne Mueller
    • 1
  • Paul M. Kunko
    • 1
  • David Whiteside
    • 1
  • Cynthia Haskett
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Chemistry of Behavior ProgramTexas Christian UniversityFort WorthUSA

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