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Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 378, Issue 2, pp 185–187 | Cite as

Impaired thermoregulation in pregnant rabbits at term

  • L. K. Vaughn
  • W. L. Veale
  • K. E. Cooper
Heart, Circulation, Respiration and Blood; Environmental and Exercise Physiology Letters and Notes

Summary

Pregnant and nonpregnant female rabbits were placed in hot (33°C) and cold (3°C) environments and their core temperatures measured. Pregnant rabbits during the 3 days before giving birth were less able to maintain normal body temperatures in thermally adverse environments than were nonpregnant rabbits. This alteration in thermoregulatory ability may permit an environmental temperature change that is not dangerous to nonpregnant rabbits to be potentially harmful or lethal to both mother and offspring.

Key words

Pregnancy hyperthermia hypothermia temperature regulation 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. K. Vaughn
    • 1
  • W. L. Veale
    • 1
  • K. E. Cooper
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Medical Physiology, Faculty of MedicineThe University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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