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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 61, Issue 3, pp 175–183 | Cite as

Systematics of theLactobacillus population on rat intestinal mucosa with special reference toLactobacillus reuteri

  • G. Molin
  • M -L. Johansson
  • M. Ståhl
  • S. Ahrné
  • R. Andersson
  • B. Jeppsson
  • S. Bengmark
Article

Abstract

The systematics of theLactobacillus population of the intestines of 88 different rats was studied; 80 rats had been fed on fermented oat-meal soup (Molin et al. 1992). One-hundred-twenty-twoLactobacillus strains from the intestinal mucosa were phenotypically classified together with twenty-eight reference strains ofLactobacillus andLeuconostoc, using 49 unit characters. Data were examined using Jaccard coefficient, and unweighted pair group algorithm with arithmetic averages. Two major and eleven minor clusters were defined at the 76% SJ-similarity level: Cluster 1 included thirty isolates which could not be identified further, but had resemblance to the type strains ofL. jensenii, L. gasseri, L. crispatus, and to some extent toL. acidophilus. Cluster 12 including fifty-four intestinal isolates was identified asL. reuteri; and so was cluster 13 (five isolates). Isolates of the major clusters were found in all parts of the intestines. The genomic homogeneity of theL. reuteri isolates was scrutinized by endonuclease restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA, and the isolates could be divided into six genomic strains.

Key words

taxonomy Lactobacillus rat intestine mucosa L. reuteri 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Molin
    • 1
  • M -L. Johansson
    • 1
  • M. Ståhl
    • 1
  • S. Ahrné
    • 1
  • R. Andersson
    • 2
  • B. Jeppsson
    • 2
  • S. Bengmark
    • 2
  1. 1.Food- and Environmental MicrobiologyChemical CenterLundSweden
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryLund UniversityLundSweden

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