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Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 393, Issue 3, pp 278–280 | Cite as

Hypothalamic thermosensitivity in an Emu,Dromiceius novae-hollandiae

  • C. Jessen
  • J. R. S. Hales
  • G. S. Molyneux
Heart, Circulation, Respiration and Blood; Environmental and Exercise Physiology Letters and Notes

Abstract

Thermosensitivity of the rostral brainstem was tested in a conscious Emu which had been previously implanted with a hypothalamic perfusion thermode. Hypothalamic warming decreased colonic temperature and cooling increased it. The maximum response to cooling occurred at a hypothalamic temperature of 34.4 °C and was accompanied by visible shivering. Thus in the Emu specific hypothalamic thermosensitivity appears to extend, relative to that in other avian species, further down into the hypothermic range, to some extent resembling the mammalian type of brainstem thermosensitivity.

Key words

Avian temperature regulation Hypothalamic thermosensitivity 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Jessen
    • 1
  • J. R. S. Hales
    • 1
  • G. S. Molyneux
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Animal and Food SciencesCSIROProspect (Sydney)Australia

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