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A case for the medical administrator of an intensive therapy unit to be trained in intensive therapy

Abstract

It is suggested that there should be available post-graduate training schemes for members of the profession who ultimately wish to work on an Intensive Therapy Unit at Consultant level. The duties of the Medical Unit administrator are described and schemes are suggested for further training of an anaesthetist or physician particularly interested in critical patient care.

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References

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    Intensive Care. B.M.A. Planning Unit Report no. 1. Brit. Med. Assoc. (1967)

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    Intensive therapy units. Intensive therapy nursing group. R.C.N. and Nat. Council of Nurses of the U.K. (1969)

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    Robinson, J. S.: The design and function of an intensive care unit. Brit. J. Anaesth. 38, 132–142 (1966)

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    Verner, I. R.: The organisation, design, and staffing of intensive therapy units. Brit. J. Hosp. Med. 11, 828–830 (1974)

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Additional information

The Editorial article in the last issue was based on the Paper by Drs. Chew and Hanson and the publishers apologise for its omission in that number.

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Chew, H.E.R., Hanson, G.C. A case for the medical administrator of an intensive therapy unit to be trained in intensive therapy. Europ. J. Intensive Care Med 2, 107–110 (1976). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00579690

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Key words

  • Medical administrator
  • Intensive therapy unit
  • Duties
  • Training schemes
  • Physician
  • Anaesthetist
  • Critical care