Environmental and Ecological Statistics

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 51–64

Statistical aspects of inhalation toxicokinetics

  • Michael Becka
  • Wolfgand Urfer
Papers

Abstract

The statistical analysis of dynamic processes is a useful tool to learn how environmental and ecological systems work and how they respond to disturbances. In the context of human risk assessment of potentially harmful chemicals, many complex dynamic processes in terms of kinetics have to be taken into account. Thorough research of direct influence of chemicals to humans depends on investigations with animalsin vivo andin vitro. However, when animals serve as models of human systems, one critical step is the extrapolation from the risk observed in the experimental animals to the risk associated with the human organism. To extrapolate the observed risk in this case, the detailed knowledge of the relevant kinetic processes as well as their differences between species is fundamental. On the other hand experimental tools for these processes are quite restrictive. Based on simple experimental designs a statistical method is proposed for characterizing such kinetic processes using the well-known compartmental analysis tool and non-linear regression. The methodology is then exemplified by non-invasive toxicokinetic inhalation experiments with rats.

Keywords

Deterministic compartmental model dynamic system kinetic process nonlinear regression toxicology 

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Becka
    • 1
  • Wolfgand Urfer
    • 2
  1. 1.Bayer AG, Biometry EuropeWuppertalGermany
  2. 2.Department of StatisticsUniversity of DortmundDortmundGermany

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