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Effect of ingestion pattern on rehydration and exercise performance subsequent to passive dehydration

  • B. Melin
  • M. Curé
  • C. Jimenez
  • N. Koulmann
  • G. Savourey
  • J. Bittel
Article

Abstract

Six male volunteers performed three tests, each comprising a passive heating session to obtain dehydration (loss of 2.6% body mass), followed by exercise on a treadmill until exhaustion (50% of maximal oxygen consumption) in a warm environment (dry bulb temperature 35° C, relative humidity 20%–30%). In one test, the subjects exercised without rehydration (Dh). In the two other tests, 50% of the fluid lost in the dehydration session was replaced by drinking mineral water given either in one amount [913 (SEM 23) ml] before the exercise (Rh1) or divided into four equal portions [228 (SEM 5) ml] before the exercise and on three occasions at 15-min intervals during exercise (Rh4). Rehydration increased exercise duration in Rh1 compared to Dh [112 (SEM 7) min and 82 (SEM 3) min, respectively;P < 0.05]. The difference was not significant with Rh4 [103 (SEM 9) min]. A restoration of the time course of changes in plasma volume, plasma osmolality, heart rate and rectal temperature occurred immediately in Rh1 and was delayed in Rh4 until after 60 min of exercise. Our results demonstrated that the swift replacement of the fluid loss in the dehydrated subjects was beneficial to exercise performance by rapidly correcting the disturbances in body fluid balance.

Key words

Exercise Dehydration Rehydration Cardiovascular responses Body temperatures 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Melin
    • 1
  • M. Curé
    • 1
  • C. Jimenez
    • 1
  • N. Koulmann
    • 1
  • G. Savourey
    • 2
  • J. Bittel
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Unité de Bioénergétique et Environnement, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des ArméesLa Tronche CédexFrance
  2. 2.Unité de Thermophysiologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des ArméesLa Tronche CédexFrance

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