European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 55–72 | Cite as

Prognosis in autism: do specialist treatments affect long-term outcome?

  • P. Howlin
Review Article

Abstract

Many different treatments have been claimed to have a dramatic impact on children with autism. This paper reviews what is known about the outcome in adult life and examines the limitations and advantages of a variety of intervention approaches. It concludes that there is little evidence of any “cure” for autism, but appropriately structured programmes for education and management in the early years can play a significant role in enhancing functioning in later life.

Key words

Autism prognosis follow-up interventions 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Howlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySt. George's Hospital Medical School TootingLondonUK

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