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Molecular Breeding

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 219–224 | Cite as

A major locus for submergence tolerance mapped on rice chromosome 9

  • Kenong Xu
  • David J. Mackill
Research Paper

Abstract

Submergence stress is a widespread problem in rice-growing environments where drainage is impeded. A few cultivars can tolerate more than 10 days of submergence, but the genes conferring this tolerance have not been identified. We used randon-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers to map submergence tolerance in 169 F2 plants and the resulting F3 families of a cross between a tolerant indica rice line, IR40931-26, and a susceptible japonica line, PI543851. IR40931-26 inherited strong submergence tolerance from the unimproved cultivar FR13A. Eight-day old F3 seedlings were submerged for 14–16 days in 55-cm deep tanks, and tolerance was scored after 7 days recovery on a scale of 1 (tolerant) to 9 (susceptible). The tolerant and susceptible parents scored 1.5 and 8.4, respectively, and the F3 means ranged from 1.6 to 8.9. Two bulks were formed with DNA from F2 plants corresponding to the nine most tolerant and the nine most susceptible F3 families. Of 624 RAPD primers used to screen the bulks, five produced bands associated with either tolerance or susceptibility. These markers were mapped to a region of chromosome 9 by linkage to RFLP markers. A submergence tolerance quantitative trait locus (QTL), here designatedSub1, was located ca. 4 cM from the RFLP marker C1232 and accounted for 69% of the phenotypic variance for the trait.

Key words

Oryza sativa L. submergence tolerance RAPD RFLP genome mapping 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenong Xu
    • 1
  • David J. Mackill
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy & Range ScienceUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  2. 2.USDA-ARSBeltsvilleUSA

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