Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 612–622 | Cite as

Reaction of water with glass: influence of a transformed surface layer

  • R. H. Do Remus
  • Y. Mehrotra
  • W. A. Lanford
  • C. Burman
Papers

Abstract

Profiles of hydrogen and glass constituents were measured by nuclear reaction techniques in a number of silicate glasses after hydration. The results were interpreted in terms of interdiffusion of alkali and hydronium ions, including the possibility of a transformed surface layer. Durable glasses such as a commercial soda-lime and caesium-alkali-lime glasses did not have a transformed layer, whereas less durable glasses, such as a soda-lime without alumina and a sodium-potassium-lime, did have a transformed surface layer. When a transformed layer is incorporated in the interdiffusion model, the diffusion coefficient of sodium calculated is the same as found in the dry glass.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. H. Do Remus
    • 1
  • Y. Mehrotra
    • 1
  • W. A. Lanford
    • 2
  • C. Burman
    • 2
  1. 1.Materials Engineering DepartmentRensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA
  2. 2.Physics DepartmentState University of New YorkAlbanyUSA

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