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Flexural fatigue and surface abrasion of Kevlar-29 and other high-modulus fibres

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Abstract

This investigation deals with some flexural fatigue and abrasion studies of Kevlar-29, glass and carbon fibres. The test methods included in the study are fatigue by pure flexing, buckling and rotation over a wire, and abrasion by rubbing against a rotating rod. Kevlar-29 fibres were found to perform well in these tests because they could survive the relatively high bending strains by yielding in axial compression. Carbon and glass fibres, although unable to survive at these high strains, did perform well when very low bending strains and tensions were used. Kevlar-29 fibres were found to be less abrasion-resistant than glass fibres, probably because of their low radial strength. The fracture morphologies of Kevlar-29 fibres in nearly all these tests showed axial splitting, confirming indications of low strength in the fibre perpendicular to its axis.

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    B. C. Jariwala, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Manchester, 1974.

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    S. F. Calil, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Manchester, 1977.

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    J. W. S. Hearle andB. S. Wong,J. Phys. E. to be published.

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Hearle, J.W.S., Wong, B.S. Flexural fatigue and surface abrasion of Kevlar-29 and other high-modulus fibres. J Mater Sci 12, 2447–2455 (1977). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00553932

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Keywords

  • Polymer
  • Fatigue
  • Carbon Fibre
  • High Strain
  • Glass Fibre