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European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 481–490 | Cite as

Chronic propranolol administration during pregnancy

Maternal pharmacokinetics
  • M. T. Smith
  • I. Livingstone
  • M. J. Eadie
  • W. D. Hooper
  • E. J. Triggs
Originals

Summary

The pharmacokinetics of propranolol (P) and its major metabolites, propranolol glucuronide (PGLUC), 4-hydroxypropranolol (4OHP), 4-hydroxypropranolol glucuronide (4OHPGLUC) and naphthoxylactic acid (NLA), (Walle et al. 1972) were determined, whenever possible, in the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy in thirteen patients and also when these patients were at least three months post-partum. No correlations were found between the mean arterial blood pressure (post-therapy) or the fall in blood pressure as a result of the P therapy (p> >0.05) and P dose, peak P plasma concentrations, peak 4-hydroxypropranolol (4OHP) plasma concentrations or peak (P plus 4OHP) plasma concentrations. However, a positive nonlinear relationship was found between the daily P dose (independent variable) and peak P plasma concentrations over the daily dose range 30–160 mg/day. The elimination half-lives of NLA for patients in the third trimester of pregnancy were significantly shorter (p=0.072, df=13) than those when the patients were at least three months post-partum. Also, the areas under the plasma level-time curves of NLA were significantly less (p<0.05, df=13) for patients in the third trimester of pregnancy than when these patients were at least three months post-partum. The results of this study indicate that the pharmacokinetics of P, PGLUC, 4OHP and 4OHPGLUC are not significantly altered by pregnancy. However, the kinetics of NLA do appear to be altered. The formation of NLA by N-dealkylation of P and further oxidation, appears to be competitively inhibited by unidentified substances, perhaps endogenous steroids, especially in the third trimester when compared to at least three months post-partum.

Key words

propranolol pharmacokinetics pregnancy hypertension naphthoxylactic acid 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. T. Smith
    • 1
  • I. Livingstone
    • 2
  • M. J. Eadie
    • 1
  • W. D. Hooper
    • 1
  • E. J. Triggs
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of Queensland, Royal Brisbane HospitalBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Royal Women's HospitalAustralia
  3. 3.Department of PharmacyUniversity of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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