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European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 181–190 | Cite as

The outcome in children with childhood autism and Asperger syndrome originally diagnosed as psychotic. A 30-year follow-up study of subjects hospitalized as children

  • F. W. Larsen
  • S. E. Mouridsen
Original Contribution

Abstract

This follow-up study reports data on 18 children fulfilling the ICD-10 criteria for childhood autism (n=9) and Asperger syndrome (n=9). In connection with the present study the original child psychiatric records were reassessed according to the ICD-10 criteria. The children were followed over a period of 30 years. The mean age at the time of study was 38 years. The results show that in adulthood the autistic patients had a poorer outcome than children with Asperger syndrome as regards education, employment, autonomy, marriage, reproduction and the need for continuing medical and institutional care. Particular attention is given to pharmacotherapy and the relationship between the childhood disorder and psychiatric morbidity in adult life.

Key words

Asperger syndrome childhood autism longitudinal study outcome 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. W. Larsen
    • 1
  • S. E. Mouridsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child PsychiatryBispebjerg HospitalCopenhagenDenmark

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