Investigation of physical parameters important for the solid state fermentation of straw by white rot fungi

  • F. Zadražil
  • H. Brunnert
Microbiology of Sewage and Industrial Wastes

Summary

In laboratory and semi-industrial scale experiments the influence of the substrate water content, temperature, and incubation time on the progress of solid state fermentation of straw colonized by white rot fungi was investigated. The parameters used to evaluate the fermentation process were degradation of total organic matter and lignin, in vitro digestibility, the content of water soluble substances in the substrate and the pH.

The degradation of total organic matter was species specific. Only Trametes hirsuta enhanced the degradation at elevated temperature (30 °C). With Abortiporus biennis, Ganoderma applanatum, and Pleurotus serotinus, elevated temperature had and adverse effect. Prolonged incubation only improved degradation of straw by the relatively slowgrowing fungi Ganoderma applanatum, Lenzites betulina, and Pleurotus sajor caju.

Elevated temperature and prolonged incubation shifted the relative degradation rates in favour of total organic matter degradation. With Ganoderma applanatum, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Pleurotus serotinus lignin degradation, even on an absolute scale, was less at 30 °C than at 22 °C.

In general, the in vitro digestibility also decreased, when the incubation time and temperature were raised. With Ganoderma applanatum the in vitro digestibility dropped below the value of the sterile straw control.

Solid state fermentation of straw was at an optimum at a medium water content of 75 ml/25 g of substrate. However, most of the fungi tested could digest straw over a wide range of water content. At higher water contents (125–150 ml/25 g of substrate) an increased production of aerial mycelium was observed.

In semi-industrial batch experiments (40 kg) with Abortiporus biennis the in vitro digestibility dropped below the reference value for sterile straw during the first 19 days of incubation. Later, the in vitro digestibility again rose and reached its optimum after about 60 days. The in vitro digestibility in the semi-industrial experiments was always lower than in the laboratory experiments (+9% and +25%, respectively).

In long term experiments (2.5 kg batches, 8 months of incubation) very different values for the in vitro digestibility were found, and these depended on the fungus used (Abortiporus biennis, +16%; Pleurotus ostreatus, +4%; and Ganoderma applanatum, −27%).

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ammer U (1963) Forstwiss Centralbl 82:360–391Google Scholar
  2. Barrows I, Seal KJ, Eggins HDW (1979) Biodegradation of barley straw by Coprinus cinereus for the production of ruminent feed in: Grossbard E (3d) Straw decay and its effect on utilization and disposal. John Wiley & Sons LTD, Chichester, New York, Brisbane, Toronto, pp 147–154Google Scholar
  3. Bavendamm W, Reichelt H (1939) Arch Mikrobiol 10:486–544Google Scholar
  4. Beck K (1977) Der Champignon 193:17–27Google Scholar
  5. Francescuti B (1972) Verfahren und Vorrichtungen zum Anbau von Pilzen. Deutsches Patentamt (Offenlegungsschrift) 2251 90Google Scholar
  6. Gerrits JPG (1975) Champignoncultuur 19:254–260Google Scholar
  7. Griffin DM (1977) Ann Rev Phytopathol 15:319–329Google Scholar
  8. Halse OM (1926) Papier Journalen 10:121–126Google Scholar
  9. Hartley RD, Jones EC, King NJ, Smith GA (1974) J Sci Food Agric 25:433–437Google Scholar
  10. Henke D (1979) Mushroom Sci X:137–147Google Scholar
  11. Kirk KT, Moore WE (1972) Wood Fiber 4:72–79Google Scholar
  12. Lehmann KB, Scheibe E (1923) Arch Hyg 92:89–108Google Scholar
  13. Letham MJ (1979) Pretreatment of barley straw with white rot fungi to improve digestion. In: Grossbard E (ed) Straw decay and its effect on utilization and disposal. John Wiley & Sons LTD, Chichester, New York, Brisbane, Toronto, p 131–137Google Scholar
  14. Lindenfelser LA, Detroy RW, Ramstack IM, Worden KA (1979) Dev Ind Microbiol 20:541–551Google Scholar
  15. Rypáček V (1952) Spysy vyd Přírodovědeckou fakultou, Masarykovy University v Brně 335:49–7Google Scholar
  16. Rypáček V (1966) Biologie holzzerstörender Pilze, VEB G Fisher Verlag, JenaGoogle Scholar
  17. Scháněl L, Rypáček V (1958) Spysy vyd Přírodovědeckou fakultou Masarykova University v Brně 336–396Google Scholar
  18. Tilley JMA, Terry RA (1963) J Br Grassl Soc 18:104–111Google Scholar
  19. Zadražil F (1976) Z Acker Pflanzenbau 142:44–52Google Scholar
  20. Zadražil F (1977) Eur J Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 4:273–281Google Scholar
  21. Zadražil F (1979) Mushroom Sci X:231–241Google Scholar
  22. Zadražil F, Brunnert H (1979) Z Pflanzenernaehr Bodenkd 142:446–455Google Scholar
  23. Zadražil F, Brunnert H (1980) Eur J Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 9:37–44Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Zadražil
    • 1
  • H. Brunnert
    • 1
  1. 1.Bundesforschungsanstalt für LandwirtschaftInstitut für BodenbiologieBraunschweigGermany

Personalised recommendations