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Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology

, Volume 329, Issue 2, pp 162–166 | Cite as

Cardiac postjunctional supersensitivity to β-agonists after chronic chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine

  • R. G. Chess-Williams
  • P. F. Grassby
  • W. Culling
  • W. Penny
  • K. J. Broadley
  • D. J. Sheridan
Article

Summary

The sensitivity to sympathomimetic amines of isolated atria removed from sham-injected and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated (6-OHDA) guinea-pigs was examined in the presence of an extraneuronal uptake blocker and an α-adrenoceptor antagonist. Three weeks of pretreatment with 6-OHDA resulted in leftwards shifts of the dose-response curves for the positive chronotropic and inotropic responses of right and left atria to isoprenaline. The responses to the partial agonist salbutamol were also potentiated after 6-OHDA pretreatment, revealed as an increase in the maximum response relative to isoprenaline.

The supersensitivity was post-synaptic in origin and independent of changes in disposition or metabolism, since it was observed with agonists immune to neuronal uptake and O-methylation, and in the presence of extraneuronal uptake inhibition by metanephrine. It was also specific for the β-adrenoceptor, no supersensitivity to histamine being found. In the right atria, the supersensitivity was partially masked by an opposing depressant effect after 6-OHDA pretreatment which was observed with histamine.

Dissociation constants (KA) for the left atrial inotropic responses to orciprenaline were determined by use of the antagonist Ro 03-7894. Atria from 6-OHDA-pretreated animals were supersensitive to orciprenaline, but the KA value did not differ from that after sham injection. It could therefore be concluded that the increase in sensitivity was not due to an increase in affinity for the β-adrenoceptor.

Key words

Guinea-pig atria 6-Hydroxydopamine Supersensitivity β-Adrenoceptor Agonist affinity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. Chess-Williams
    • 1
  • P. F. Grassby
    • 1
  • W. Culling
    • 2
  • W. Penny
    • 2
  • K. J. Broadley
    • 1
  • D. J. Sheridan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of Wales Institute of Science and TechnologyCardiffUK
  2. 2.Department of CardiologyUniversity Hospital of WalesCardiffUK

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