Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 17, Issue 5–6, pp 565–573 | Cite as

Purine transport by Malpighian tubules of pteridine-deficient eye color mutants of Drosophila melanogaster

  • David T. Sullivan
  • L. Anne Bell
  • Duncan R. Paton
  • Marie C. Sullivan
Article

Abstract

Uptakes of guanine into Malpighian tubules of wild-type Drosophila and the eye color mutants white (w), brown (bw), and pink-peach (pp) have been compared. Tubules for each of these mutants are unable to concentrate guanine intracellularly. The transport of xanthine and riboflavin is also deficient in w tubules. The transport of guanosine, adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanosine monophosphate is similar in wild-type and white Malpighian tubules. These data and other information about these mutants make it likely that these pteridine-deficient eye color mutants do not produce pigments because of the inability to transport a pteridine precursor. This view supports the hypothesis that mutants which lack both pteridine and ommochromes do so because precursors to both classes of pigments share a common transport system.

Key words

Drosophila melanogaster Malpighian tubules purine transport eye color mutants riboflavin 

References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • David T. Sullivan
    • 1
  • L. Anne Bell
    • 1
  • Duncan R. Paton
    • 1
  • Marie C. Sullivan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologySyracuse UniversitySyracuse

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