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Histochemistry

, Volume 80, Issue 4, pp 411–413 | Cite as

Immunohistochemical localization of nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor in guinea pig prostate gland

  • H. Shikata
  • N. Utsumi
  • M. Hiramatsu
  • N. Minami
  • N. Nemoto
  • T. Shikata
Short Communications

Summary

Prostate glands of adult guinea pigs were stained for nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) by immunohistochemical methods. Both NGF and EGF were localized diffusely in the cytoplasm of the glandular epithelial cells, and also in their secretory products. These findings suggest that NGF and EGF are synthesized, stored, and secreted by the glandular epithelial cells of the prostate.

Keywords

Public Health Growth Factor Epithelial Cell Epidermal Growth Factor Nerve Growth Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Shikata
    • 1
  • N. Utsumi
    • 1
  • M. Hiramatsu
    • 2
  • N. Minami
    • 2
  • N. Nemoto
    • 3
  • T. Shikata
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Oral PathologyJosai Dental UniversitySakado, SaitamJapan
  2. 2.Department of Dental PharmacologyJosai Dental UniversitySakado, SaitamJapan
  3. 3.Department of PathologyNihon University School of MedicineItabashi, TokyoJapan

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