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Histochemistry

, Volume 87, Issue 3, pp 273–278 | Cite as

Significant depletion of NPY in the innervation of the rat mesenteric, renal arteries and kidneys in experimentally (aorta coarctation) induced hypertension

  • J. Ballesta
  • J. A. Lawson
  • D. T. Pals
  • J. H. Ludens
  • Y. C. Lee
  • S. R. Bloom
  • J. M. Polak
Article

Summary

The distribution and concentrations of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in kidneys, renal arteries, heart, aorta, mesenteric artery and adrenal glands from aorta-ligated hypertensive rats were studied by immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay. Immunocytochemistry showed that in the hypertensive animals NPY-immunoreactive fibres were decreased in both kidney and renal artery, above and below the ligation, and in mesenteric arteries. The depletion of NPY-containing nerves in the kidney was more pronounced around the juxtaglomerular apparatus than in other areas of the organ. By radioimmunoassay, the concentrations of NPY immunoreactivity were significantly lower in the hypertensive animals when compared with the controls, (kidney: hypertensive 1.0±0.1; controls 2.0±0.2 pmol/g, mean±SEM; p<0.05 renal artery: hypertensive 5.0±0.8; controls 12.1±2.0; p<0.05 and mesenteric artery: hypertensive 8.6±1.9; 17.6±3.0; p<0.01). While there were no statistically significant changes in the levels of NPY immunoreactivity in the other areas studied, there was a general trend for the level to fall in the renal artery below the ligation (hypertensive 10.6±1.5; control 15.3±2.4; p>0.05). It is of interest that changes were observed in the vasoconstrictor peptide NPY in this commonly used model of hypertension.

Keywords

Public Health Peptide Hypertension Renal Artery General Trend 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Ballesta
    • 1
  • J. A. Lawson
    • 3
  • D. T. Pals
    • 3
  • J. H. Ludens
    • 3
  • Y. C. Lee
    • 2
  • S. R. Bloom
    • 2
  • J. M. Polak
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Histochemistry Royal Postgraduate Medical SchoolHammersmith HospitalLondonEngland
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical SchoolHammersmith HospitalLondonEngland
  3. 3.Cardiovascular Diseases ResearchThe Upjohn CompanyKalamazooUSA

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