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Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 66, Issue 3–4, pp 267–276 | Cite as

Removal of sulphur dioxide and sulphates from the atmospheric surface layer during frost formation

  • T. Georgiadis
  • V. Strocchi
  • F. Fortezza
  • P. Lucialli
  • P. Bonasoni
  • G. Giovanelli
Article

Abstract

In order to establish the amount of removal of SO2 and sulphates from the lowest layer of the atmosphere during frost formation, a field measurement experiment was conducted in January 1990 in the Ravenna area. Frost can bring about removal of particles, gases and hydrosoluble substances. In common with areas of the Po Valley, Ravenna is frequently subjected to atmospheric conditions that can cause frost. During the winter of 1990, clear skies at night, that were associated with high pressure fields, strongly influenced the formation of frost. Close to industrial plants, characterized by wet emission of plumes, this frost has an adverse impact on soil, commonly known as ‘chemical snow’. A large number of frost samples, collected in three locations representing typical but different features of the area (rural, urban and sea front sites), were analyzed. Analysis of the data reveals that SO2 is the major contributor SO4−− trapped in frost.

Keywords

Dioxide Surface Layer Measurement Experiment Lower Layer Field Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Georgiadis
    • 1
  • V. Strocchi
    • 2
  • F. Fortezza
    • 2
  • P. Lucialli
    • 2
  • P. Bonasoni
    • 1
  • G. Giovanelli
    • 1
  1. 1.FISBAT - C.N.R.BolognaItaly
  2. 2.PMP - USL 35RavennaItaly

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