Advertisement

Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 84, Issue 1–2, pp 51–59 | Cite as

Sorption of antimony species by humic acid

  • Janette Pilarski
  • Pamela Waller
  • William Pickering
Article

Abstract

The retention of antimony (a potential toxin) in polluted soils or waterway sediments can involve interaction with several component phases. One of these, humic acid, has been found to adsorb antimony (III) from solutions of Sb(OH)3 or potassium antimonyl tartrate (C8H4K2Sb2O12) in accordance with Langmuir type isotherms. Using Sb(OH)3 solutions (initial Sb levels < 10 μM) the bonding constant value (at pH 4) was 6 × 105, with a calculated saturation capacity of 23 μmol g−1. In the antimonyl tartrate systems (initial Sb levels 0.5 to 75 μM) the bonding constant value for the sorbed species was 1.6 × 105 and the saturation capacity 53 μmol g−1. Addition of small amounts of HCl or NaOH (to vary the pH between 3.1 and 5.4) had little effect on the amount sorbed from KSbT solutions but with Sb(OH)3 solutions uptake was reduced (by about 15%). In the presence of NaCl (0.5 or 0.05M) Sb uptake increased (by about 15%). Antimony (V) (introduced as KSb (OH)6) was not sorbed from solutions < 10 μM in this salt. Using more concentrated solutions, uptake gradually increased, reaching a plateau value of around 8 μmol g−1 with solutions initially 50 or 75 μM.

Keywords

Humic Acid Antimony Sorb Concentrate Solution Tartrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Boyle, R. W. and Jonasson, I. R.: 1973, J. Geochem. Explor. 2, 251.Google Scholar
  2. Brannon, J. M. and Patrick, W. H.: 1985, Environ. Pollut. Ser. B. 9, 107.Google Scholar
  3. Crecelius, E. A., Bothner, M. H. and Carpenter, R.: 1975, Environ. Sci. Techol. 9, 325.Google Scholar
  4. Gate, S. H. and Richardson, E.: 1961, J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 23, 97.Google Scholar
  5. Gate, S. H. and Richardson, E.: 1961, J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 23, 265.Google Scholar
  6. Gayer, K. H. and Garrett, A. B.: 1952, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 74, 2352.Google Scholar
  7. Ghoda, S.: 1975, Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 48, 1213.Google Scholar
  8. Gilbert, T. R. and Hume, D. N.: 1973, Anal. Chim. Acta. 65, 451.Google Scholar
  9. Ragaini, R. C., Raison, H. R. and Roberts, N.: 1977. Environ. Sci. Technol. 11, 773.Google Scholar
  10. Strohal, P., Huljev, D., Lulic, S. and Picer, M.: 1975, Estuarine Coastal Mar. Sci. 3, 119.Google Scholar
  11. Thanabalasingam, P. and Pickering, W. F.: 1985. Environ. Pollut. Ser. B. 9, 267.Google Scholar
  12. Thanabalasingam, P. and Pickering, W. F.: 1986. Environ. Pollut. Ser. B. 12, 233.Google Scholar
  13. Thanabalasingam, P. and Pickering, W. F.: 1990, Water. Air, and Soil Pollut. 49, 175.Google Scholar
  14. Waller, P. A. and Pickering, W. F.: 1991, Chem. Spec. Bioavail. 3, 9.Google Scholar
  15. Waller, P. A. and Pickering, W. F.: 1995, Talanta 5, 42, 197.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janette Pilarski
    • 1
  • Pamela Waller
    • 1
  • William Pickering
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemistry DepartmentUniversity of NewcastleN.S.W.Australia

Personalised recommendations