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A systematic relationship between phytochrome-controlled development and species habitat, for plants grown in simulated natural radiation

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Abstract

A survey of the responsiveness of plant species, typical of open and shade habitats, to simulated natural shade-light quality (i.e. white light plus supplementary far-red) has demonstrated a systematic relationship between habitat and certain developmental responses. Supplementary far-red light has a much greater effect on stem extension rate, petiole length, and leaf dry weight: stem dry weight ratio of the open habitat, shade-intolerant species. Far-red effects on leaf chlorophyll content show no such systematic grading. These results are discussed in relation to habitat adaptation. In most cases, the relationship between developmental response and the estimated phytochrome photoequilibrium, which is established by the radiation treatment, is linear. This is taken as an indication of phytochrome involvement in shade perception.

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Abbreviations

P fr :

far-red light absorbing form of phytochrome

P total :

total phytochrome

PAR:

photosynthetically active radiation

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Paper 8 in the series “The Function of Phytochrome in the Natural Environment”; for paper 7 see Morgan and Smith (1978)

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Morgan, D.C., Smith, H. A systematic relationship between phytochrome-controlled development and species habitat, for plants grown in simulated natural radiation. Planta 145, 253–258 (1979). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00454449

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Key words

  • Phytochrome
  • Development habitat
  • Natural radiation