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European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 148, Issue 4, pp 365–367 | Cite as

Dexamethasone in neonatal chronic lung disease: pulmonary effects and intracranial complications

  • C. M. Noble-Jamieson
  • R. Regev
  • M. Silverman
Neonatology

Abstract

Eighteen infants were entered into a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of dexamethasone therapy for chronic lung disease. Initial ventilation requirements were similar in the two groups, although all infants were in headbox oxygen on entry to the trial. The dexamethasone-treated infants showed a significantly more rapid improvement during the 1st week of treatment, although the overall duration of oxygen therapy was similar in both groups. Cranial ultrasound examination revealed new periventricular abnormalities in three out of the five dexamethasone-treated infants who had previously normal scans, compared with none of four similar placebotreated infants. A large trial, focussing on potential complications, is now needed.

Key words

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia Dexamethasone Periventricular leucomalacia 

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References

  1. 1.
    Avery GB, Fletcher AB, Kaplan M, Brudno DS (1985) Controlled trial of dexamethasone in respirator-dependent infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Pediatrics 75:106–111Google Scholar
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    Bonta BW, Otero L (1985) Efficacy of dexamethasone in the management of progressive bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Pediatr Res 19:335AGoogle Scholar
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    Greenough A, Roberton NRC (1985) Morbidity and survival in neonates ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome. Br Med J 290:597–600Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Regev R, DeVries LS, Noble-Jamieson CM, Silverman M (1987) Dexamethasone and increased intracranial echogenicity. Lancet I:632–633Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. M. Noble-Jamieson
    • 1
  • R. Regev
    • 1
  • M. Silverman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical SchoolHammersmith HospitalLondonUK

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