Mycopathologia

, Volume 108, Issue 3, pp 195–199

Paecilotoxin production in clinical or terrestrial isolates of Paecilomyces lilacinus strains

  • Yuzuru Mikami
  • Katsukiyo Yazawa
  • Kazutaka Fukushima
  • Tadashi Arai
  • Shun-ichi Udagawa
  • Robert A. Samson
Article

Abstract

The production of paecilotoxin from various isolates of Paecilomyces lilacinus was studied using three different media and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Alkaline medium was found to be suitable for the production of the toxins. Among 20 strains tested, 19 including four clinical isolates were found to produce the toxins. Production patterns of paecilotoxins were very similar in each strain and the main toxins were A and B.

Key words

Paecilomyces lilacinus paecilotoxin distribution HPLC clinical isolates entomopathogenic nematode-killing fungi 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuzuru Mikami
    • 1
  • Katsukiyo Yazawa
    • 1
  • Kazutaka Fukushima
    • 1
  • Tadashi Arai
    • 1
  • Shun-ichi Udagawa
    • 2
  • Robert A. Samson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Experimental Chemotherapy, Research Center for Pathogenic Fungi and Microbial ToxicosesChiba UniversityChibaJapan
  2. 2.Division of MicrobiologyNational Institute of Hygienic SciencesTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Centraalbureau voor SchimmelculturesAG BaarnThe Netherlands

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