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Epinephrine inhibition of the electrodermal response in the cat

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Abstract

Intravenous administration of epinephrine results in a dose-dependent inhibition of the peripherally evoked electrodermal response (EDR) in the cat. The magnitude of this depression of the EDR was greater when the responses were evoked by a single shock than by a train of shocks (10–12 Hz). The observation that this epinephrine-induced inhibition is antagonized by phentolamine suggests that an alpha-adrenergic mechanism is involved. It is unlikely that this effect is due primarily to the vascular actions of epinephrine because the inhibition of the EDR was much more prolonged than was the pressor action. Angiotensin was ineffective in inhibiting these responses.

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Koss, M.C., Davison, M.A. & Bernthal, P.J. Epinephrine inhibition of the electrodermal response in the cat. Psychopharmacology 50, 149–152 (1976). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00430484

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Key words

  • Electrodermal response
  • Epinephrine
  • Phentolamine
  • Angiotensin