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Variable resistance versus constant resistance strength training in adult males

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Summary

Changes in strength, body composition and anthropometric measures for groups training with constant resistance and variable resistance training procedures was compared. Thirty-six male volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Constant Resistance (CR), Variable Resistance (VR) and Control (C). Strength training was conducted 3 days per week, 45 min per day, for 10 weeks. The results demonstrated that both the CR and the VR groups increased muscular strength. The CR group demonstrated significant increases in strength over the VR group when strength was assessed by CR procedures. Conversely, the VR group demonstrated significant increases in strength over the CR group when strength was assessed by VR procedures. Neither group exhibited superiority over the other relative to changes in body composition and anthropometric measures. The significance of these results is discussed.

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Pipes, T.V. Variable resistance versus constant resistance strength training in adult males. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. 39, 27–35 (1978). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00429676

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Key words

  • Strength
  • Strength training
  • Constant resistance
  • Variable resistance
  • Body composition changes with training
  • Concept of specificity