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Planta

, Volume 155, Issue 4, pp 345–349 | Cite as

Growth regulators, Rhizobium and nodulation in peas

Indole-3-acetic acid from the culture medium of nodulating and non-nodulating strains of R. leguminosarum
  • T. L. Wang
  • E. A. Wood
  • N. J. Brewin
Article

Abstract

Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) has been identified in the culture medium of nodulating and non-nodulating strains of Rhizobium lebuminosarum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The levels of IAA produced by the different strains have been quantified using multiple ion monitoring and a deuterated internal standard. Indole-3-acetic acid is produced in the absence of exogenous tryptophan in all strains but its level is greatly stimulated by applied tryptophan. No correlation has been established between the ability to nodulate peas and the ability to produce IAA.

Key words

Auxin and nodulation Pisum (nodulation) Plasmid Rhizobium Root nodule 

Abbreviations

GCMS

gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

HPLC

high performance liquid chromatography

IAA

indole-3-acetic acid

MIM

multiple ion monitoring

TMS

trimethylsilyl

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. L. Wang
    • 1
  • E. A. Wood
    • 1
  • N. J. Brewin
    • 1
  1. 1.John Innes InstituteNorwichUK

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