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Fenfluramine and N-ethyl amphetamine: Comparison of the reinforcing and rate-decreasing actions in the rhesus monkey

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Abstract

N-ethyl amphetamine HCl (NEA) and fenfluramine HCl (meta-trifluoromethyl N-ethyl amphetamine) were evaluated as reinforcers in rhesus monkeys that had been previously trained to press a lever using food presentations and cocaine HCl injections as reinforcers. Each daily session consisted of episodic opportunities to obtain reinforcers under a fixed-ratio schedule of 30. A drug period was interpolated between two periods in which lever-press responding was maintained by food presentations. Compared to saline, none of the drugs altered the rate of responding in the food periods which preceded the drug sessions, indicating the absence of residual response-disrupting drug actions from previous sessions. However, NEA and fenfluramine self-injection resulted in dose-related decreases in response rates during the food periods which immediately followed the drug sessions. Cocaine HCl (30 Μg/kg/injection) maintained high response rates at over one response/second during the drug periods, as did the same dose of NEA. Doses of 10 and 100 Μg/kg/injection of NEA as well as all doses of fenfluramine HCl (10 through 300 Μg/kg/injection) maintained rates that were not different from those associated with saline injections. These results substantiate and extend earlier findings with fenfluramine and indicate that its failure to act as a reinforcer is attributable to its meta-trifluoromethyl group.

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Supported in part by USPHS Grant DA-00154.

R. E. T. was an NIH Predoctoral Trainee in Pharmacology, USPHS Grant GM-00198.

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Tessel, R.E., Woods, J.H. Fenfluramine and N-ethyl amphetamine: Comparison of the reinforcing and rate-decreasing actions in the rhesus monkey. Psychopharmacologia 43, 239–244 (1975). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00429257

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Key words

  • N-Ethyl Amphetamine
  • Fenfluramine
  • Cocaine
  • Self-Administration
  • Operant Conditioning
  • Rhesus Monkeys