Plasma testosterone and catecholamine responses to physical exercise of different intensities in men

  • D. JeŽová
  • M. Vigaš
  • P. Tatár
  • R. Kvetňanský
  • K. Nazar
  • H. Kaciuba-UŚcilko
  • S. Kozlowski
Article

Summary

Plasma testosterone, noradrenaline, and adrenaline concentrations during three bicycle ergometer tests of the same total work output (2160 J·kg−1) but different intensity and duration were measured in healthy male subjects. Tests A and B consisted of three consecutive exercise bouts, lasting 6 min each, of either increasing (1.5, 2.0, 2.5 W·kg−1) or constant (2.0, 2.0, 2.0 W·kg−1) work loads, respectively. In test C the subjects performed two exercise bouts each lasting 4.5 min, with work loads of 4.0 W·kg−1. All the exercise bouts were separated by 1-min periods of rest.

Exercise B of constant low intensity resulted only in a small increase in plasma noradrenaline concentration. Exercise A of graded intensity caused an increase in both catecholamine levels, whereas, during the most intensive exercise C, significant elevations in plasma noradrenaline, adrenaline and testosterone concentrations occurred. A significant positive correlation was obtained between the mean value of plasma testosterone and that of adrenaline as well as noradrenaline during exercise.

It is concluded that both plasma testosterone and catecholamine responses to physical effort depend more on work intensity than on work duration or total work output.

Key words

Exercise Testostereone Adrenaline Noradrenaline 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. JeŽová
    • 3
  • M. Vigaš
    • 3
  • P. Tatár
    • 1
    • 3
  • R. Kvetňanský
    • 3
  • K. Nazar
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Kaciuba-UŚcilko
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. Kozlowski
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Human BioclimatologyBratislavaCzechoslovakia
  2. 2.Department of Applied Physiology, Medical Research CentrePolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland
  3. 3.Institute of Experimental Endocrinology, Centre of Physiological SciencesSlovak Academy of SciencesBratislavaCSSR

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