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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 98, Issue 1, pp 187–198 | Cite as

Bifidobacterium pullorum sp. nov.: A new species isolated from chicken feces and a related group of bifidobacteria isolated from rabbit feces

  • L. D. Trovatelli
  • F. Crociani
  • M. Pedinotti
  • V. Scardovi
Article

Abstract

Among bifidobacteria isolated from feces of chickens 7 were distinctive in displaying (i) curved cells with tapered ends, mostly arranged in long chains, (ii) preferred alcaline reaction for good growth and need for Tween 80 as stimulating factor, (iii) guanosine plus cytosine content of deoxyribonucleic acid (% GC) exceptionally high (66–68 moles per cent) and (iiii) genetic unrelatdedness (DNA-DNA homology) to any other species or types of the genus Bifidobacterium except for 4 strains isolated from the feces of rabbit (59–66% similarity). A new species Bifidobacterium pullorum sp. nov. (type strain P145, ATCC27685) is proposed for the strains from chicken; the strains from rabbit were described as Unassigned Homology Group I (representative strain RA 161).

Key words

Bifidobacteria Chicken Feces Rabbit Feces 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. D. Trovatelli
    • 1
  • F. Crociani
    • 1
  • M. Pedinotti
    • 1
  • V. Scardovi
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Microbiologia AgrariaUniversità di BolognaBolognaItaly

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