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Archiv für Mikrobiologie

, Volume 88, Issue 2, pp 127–133 | Cite as

Fatty acids of a non-pigmented, thermophilic bacterium similar to Thermus aquaticus

  • Thomas J. Jackson
  • Robert F. Ramaley
  • Warren G. Meinschein
Article

Summary

The fatty acid composition of a recently isolated, extreme thermophilic bacterium of the genus Thermus has been determined and has been shown to be significantly different from that of Thermus aquaticus YT-1 when the two bacteria were grown under the same cultural conditions.

Keywords

Acid Composition Cultural Condition Fatty Acid Composition Thermophilic Bacterium Extreme Thermophilic Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Jackson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Robert F. Ramaley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Warren G. Meinschein
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of GeologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  3. 3.Atlantic Richfield CompanyDallasUSA

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