Comparison of the effects of pre-exercise feeding of glucose, glycerol and placebo on endurance and fuel homeostasis in man

  • M. Gleeson
  • R. J. Maughan
  • P. L. Greenhaff
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00423211

Cite this article as:
Gleeson, M., Maughan, R.J. & Greenhaff, P.L. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. (1986) 55: 645. doi:10.1007/BF00423211

Summary

Six men were studied during exercise to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer at 73% of \(\dot V_{O_{2max} } \) following ingestion of glycerol, glucose or placebo. Five of the subjects exercised for longer on the glucose trial compared to the placebo trial (p<0.1; 108.8 vs 95.9 min). Exercise time to exhaustion on the glucose trial was longer (p<0.01) than on the glycerol trial (86.0 min). No difference in performance was found between the glycerol and placebo trials. The ingestion of glucose (lg · kg−1 body weight) 45 min before exercise produced a 50% rise in blood glucose and a 3-fold rise in plasma insulin at zero min of exercise. Total carbohydrate oxidation was increased by 26% compared to placebo and none of the subjects exhibited a fall in blood glucose below 4 mmol · l−1 during the exercise. The ingestion of glycerol (lg · kg−1 body weight) 45 min before exercise produced a 340-fold increase in blood glycerol concentration at zero min of exercise, but did not affect resting blood glucose or plasma insulin levels; blood glucose levels were up to 14% higher (p<0.05) in the later stages of exercise and at exhaustion compared to the placebo or glucose trials. Both glycerol and glucose feedings lowered the magnitude of the rise in plasma FFA during exercise compared to placebo. Levels of blood lactate and alanine during exercise were not different on the 3 dietary treatments. These data contrast with previous reports that have indicated glucose feeding pre-exercise produces hypoglycaemia during strenuous submaximal exercise and reduces endurance performance. It appears that man cannot use glycerol as a gluconeogenic substrate rapidly enough to serve as a major energy source during this type of exercise.

Key words

Exercise Glucose ingestion Glycerol ingestion Endurance Metabolism 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Gleeson
    • 1
  • R. J. Maughan
    • 1
  • P. L. Greenhaff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental & Occupational MedicineUniversity Medical SchoolForesterhillScotland

Personalised recommendations