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Early rising or delayed bedtime: which is better for a short night's sleep?

  • M. Clodoré
  • O. Benoit
  • J. Foret
  • Y. Touitou
  • N. Touron
  • G. Bouard
  • A. Auzeby
Article

Summary

The present study compares the effects on sleep and the subsequent period of wakefulness of delaying bedtime of 2 h or advancing rising time by 2 h in subjects clearly differentiated by morningness or eveningness in their circadian rhythms. Twelve young healthy good sleepers, six morning types (MT) and six evening types (ET), were selected. The data obtained from the second 24 h (night and day) with delayed bedtime (DB) and advanced rising time (AR) were compared with those obtained in the reference condition (R) with normal sleep schedules. Sleep was recorded polygraphically and rectal temperature was continuously monitored during the nights and during the day following the second night of each condition. Subjective estimations of alertness, performance tasks and urinary steroids were analysed. Early rising appeared to be more disturbing than a late bedtime. The second shortened night showed fewer characteristics of recovery sleep in AR than in DB. The decrease in self rated alertness was a function both of the type of condition (DB or AR) and of the morning-evening typology of the subject. The largest decrease was observed in AR and in the ET subjects. AR also resulted in the most pronounced decrease in performance tasks and in an increase in urinary 17 ketosteroids without change in the 17 hydroxy-corticosteroids. The effects on rectal temperature were limited to short periods after bedtime in DB and rising time in AR.

Key words

Sleep Alertness Circadian Temperature Urinary steroids 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Clodoré
    • 1
  • O. Benoit
    • 1
  • J. Foret
    • 2
  • Y. Touitou
    • 3
  • N. Touron
    • 1
  • G. Bouard
    • 1
  • A. Auzeby
    • 3
  1. 1.U3 INSERM 47Boulevard de l'HôpitalParis, Cedex 13
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurosensorielle CNRSParis, Cedex 06
  3. 3.Laboratoire de Biochimie, 91Boulevard de l'HôpitalParis, Cedex 14France

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