Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 129, Issue 4, pp 310–313 | Cite as

Water-soluble vitamins in cells and spent culture supernatants of Poteriochromonas stipitata, Euglena gracilis, and Tetrahymena thermophila

  • Elliott R. Baker
  • John J. A. McLaughlin
  • Seymour H. Hutner
  • Barbara DeAngelis
  • Susan Feingold
  • Oscar Frank
  • Herman Baker
Article

Abstract

Vitamins B6 and B12, biotin, folates, riboflavin, nicotinate, pantothenate, biopterin, and vitamin C (l-ascorbate) were assayed in Poteriochromonas stipitata, Euglena gracilis, and Tetrahymena thermophila cells grown in defined media and in spent culture supernatants. P. stipitata and E. gracilis synthesized, stored and excreted folates (mainly as 5-methyltetrahydrofolate), B6, riboflavin, pantothenate, nicotinate, biopterin, and ascorbate. E. gracilis synthesized and stored biotin. T. thermophila did not synthesize the above vitamins except for B12, biopterin, and ascorbate; it excreted biopterin and stored B12 and ascorbate. Thiamin was left of consideration because all 3 organisms are thiamin auxotrophs. Possible ecological implications of these findings are considered.

Key words

Poteriochromonas Euglena Tetrahymena Crithidia Vitamin excretion Vitamin B12 Biotin Thiamin Folates Vitamin B6 Riboflavin Nicotinic acid Pantothenate Vitamin C Bioterin Phytoplankton 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elliott R. Baker
    • 1
  • John J. A. McLaughlin
    • 1
  • Seymour H. Hutner
    • 2
  • Barbara DeAngelis
    • 3
    • 4
  • Susan Feingold
    • 3
    • 4
  • Oscar Frank
    • 3
    • 4
  • Herman Baker
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Louis Calder Conservation & Ecology Center of Fordham UniversityBronxUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyHaskins Laboratories of Pace UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Preventive Medicine and Community HealthNew Jersey Medical SchoolEast OrangeUSA
  4. 4.Department of MedicineNew Jersey Medical SchoolEast OrangeUSA

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