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Synthese

, Volume 108, Issue 3, pp 361–377 | Cite as

On Alan Turing's anticipation of connectionism

  • B. Jack Copeland
  • Diane Proudfoot
Article

Abstract

It is not widely realised that Turing was probably the first person to consider building computing machines out of simple, neuron-like elements connected together into networks in a largely random manner. Turing called his networks ‘unorganised machines’. By the application of what he described as ‘appropriate interference, mimicking education’ an unorganised machine can be trained to perform any task that a Turing machine can carry out, provided the number of ‘neurons’ is sufficient. Turing proposed simulating both the behaviour of the network and the training process by means of a computer program. We outline Turing's connectionist project of 1948.

Keywords

Computer Program Training Process Computing Machine Turing Machine Random Manner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Jack Copeland
    • 1
  • Diane Proudfoot
    • 1
  1. 1.Philosophy DepartmentUniversity of CanterburyChristchurchNew Zealand

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